Tuesday, 24 May 2016

Fort Ligonier May 28 - 29


Fort Ligonier is hosting a SYW event this weekend. Let's hope it stays fine.

18th Century Military History
Hear the cannons roar, meet soldiers and officers, and see exciting living history programs as nearly 100 troops occupy Fort Ligonier! Artillery demonstrations at 11:30 AM and 3:00 PM, tactical demo at 1 PM, Saturday and Sunday. (weather permitting)

Petit Jean

Slated for release in September by Plum Street Publishers. A young reader's adventure set in France, the Caribbean, and the French Colonial Arkansas frontier.
 Petit Jean Mountain, a dramatic promontory in the Arkansas River Valley, owes its name to a legend that has endured for centuries. Marguerite, a young Parisian lady disguised as a cabin boy, accompanies her fiancĂ© on a voyage to the New World to redeem the land grant he has earned in service to the king. Hiding in plain sight as Petit Jean ( Little John ), she proves herself more than capable of the demands of the journey. Drawing on variants of the legend, William B. Jones sets his fictional narrative in the French Colonial era during the reign of Louis XV. Taking his reader on a journey across the Atlantic, through Louisiana Territory, to a beloved natural landmark, Jones spins a tale of mistaken identity, love, and adventure. Kindle edition

Amazon info

Friday, 13 May 2016

Muskets and Tomahawks game


Here for a selection of images and a batrep.

Monday, 9 May 2016

Pontiac's Rebellion


Mohawk 1764

Gary Zaboly found this - never seen it before- all credit to him.

Text from here
'A real Indian comes to call
In the autumn of 1764, a real American Mohawk Indian could be seen at the Blauw Jan Inn. A German living in the Mohawk Valley had joined forced with his neighbours to earn some money in Europe. He reached Amsterdam via England with two Indians. He sold one of them, named Sychnecta, to the manager of the inn who in turn put him on display. Sychnecta was drawn there from life in his traditional costume by the artist Pieter Barbiers. A. Smit made an etching from the drawing. There are few known drawings of 18th century Mohawks, and Barbiers had made one of them, probably without knowing it. Sychnecta returned to the Mohawk Valley in the summer of 1765.'