Saturday, 16 January 2010

Hal Sherman talks about his Native American paintings

I like the paintings of Hal Sherman - they are folksy and naive in style but delightful to look at and usually covering obscure moments in Ohio history - usually around the Shawnee, Northwest territory subjecta and the War of 1812. This one is Death of General Richard Butler" or "Butler's Demise" 1791 at the battle of St. Clair's Defeat. There's a series of videos of a lecture with images on the subject of his Indian paintings below and you can see a gallery of some of his images here.

5 comments:

  1. His painting of the burnong of col. crawford is a well design straight forward portrayl of the usual fate of whitemen, in the ohio wars. The charcoal balckened face, and tied to a center post, as the indians gather fire wood is without current day PC attitude, and showed the indians defending their lands with all the savagery they could find, as they realized they could depend only on themselves to present the on rushing tide of whitemen. excellent work

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  2. I am one year older than you Hal, and I still live in Ohio not far from where I was born. I have had a lot of sympathy for the Native Americans or Indians since I can remember. To me the first white people into these lands and those following were the first "Terrorists" on this continent. Can you imagine the dread Indians felt when the white people slaughtered them -- men, women and children. We who live and breathe today would consider anyone a terrorist who did those things to us as the people from Europe came and did to Indians.

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  3. Hal I believe I use to talk to you about the Shawnee paintings you did The death of Cornstalk, and his sister Nonhelema. And how my Auntie resembles her. I am Becky Henricks bates_henricks@yahoo.com

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  4. Hal, I believe I use to talk to you about the Shawnee Cornstalk and his sister Nonhelema. You shared a number of pictures with me. I had told you how my Auntie resembled you Nonhelema. Becky Henricks

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  5. Does anyone know where Hal Sherman's artwork is housed now?

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